Monday, July 24, 2017

If your shoulder hurts when reaching for your wallet, it may be caused by your Infraspinatus Muscle - not because your cheap.

Do you have pain in your shoulder when you comb your hair, brush your teeth or reach behind your back? If it also hurts down the front and side of your arm you may have a problem with your infraspinatus muscle. The infraspinatus runs from the lower half of the scapula to the head of the humerus (the upper arm). Pictured below its primary function is to allow you to move your arm laterally. It is one of the four rotator cuff muscles. The others are supraspinatus, tere minor and subscapularis. Together these four muscles hold your arm into a socket of your scapula and allow you to rotate your arm and make throwing motions. When a shoulder is dis-located one of these four muscles is involved along with damage to the shoulder joint capsule and cartilage.


Treatment
The infraspinatus muscle can be treated by massaging along the length of the muscle fibers as well as going cross fiber (across the fibers). Trigger point therapy and myofascial release techniques are also helpful. It is also important to treat surrounding muscles that work with the infraspinatus.





Information provided by www.stevebotuchis.com

Friday, June 23, 2017

News You can Use… for better Health and Wellness

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Neck Pain and Seven Keys to Healthy Posture


Neck pain is probably the number one complaint I hear from clients followed closely by back pain complaints. All too often after spending a session on the client's neck problem I see them undoing the work before they even leave the office. They throw a heavy purse or computer bag on their shoulder or they are hunched over reading their emails. These are just some of the body mechanics that keep the cycle of pain going in an endless loop. Today I'm going to discuss seven keys to using proper body mechanics that will allow your neck to feel better with or without a massage.


 

Problem #1 – A Flexed Head Posture 
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Flexion is when you bend your head forward as in reading a book or working on a cell phone or typing on a computer keyboard ...(more)

 

Problem #2 – Head forward and Extended 
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This occurs when we stick our chin out and our head forward. Similar to a flexed neck posture this condition involves flexion of the lower neck (bending head forward) while extending the upper neck and head ...(more)

 

Problem #3 – Holding the arms out to the side and in front of you as you tend to do when working on a computer
5.jpg

When you hold the arms in this manner your trapezius muscles contract to stabilize your scapula ...(more)
 

Problem #4 – Carrying a purse or bag on your shoulder
  4.jpg

Even if the bag is empty the natural slope of the shoulder means you have to elevate the scapula/shoulder girdle by contracting the upper trapezius ...(more)

 

Problem #5 Carrying a weight in our hand 
7.jpg

Examples include carrying a computer bag, heavy purse or suitcase. Holding any weight in the hand creates a traction that pulls the shoulder girdle down toward the ground ...(more)

 

Problem #6 – Crimping a phone between the shoulder and ear 
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Crimping requires lateral flexion (bending sideways) of the neck and elevation of the shoulder girdle ...(more



Problem #7 – Unhealthy sleep posture
 
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The average person sleeps between six and seven hours per night. An unhealthy sleep posture can greatly add to a neck condition ...(more)



Five Benefits of Massage

Five great reasons to get a massage for yourself or give a gift to the one in your life you would like to thank.

  • Improve range of motion
  • Enhance immunity by stimulating lymph flow
  • Realign body structures
  • Strengthen and tone weak muscles
  • Prevention of pain and poor posture patterns of dysfunction created by muscle imbalance


Perfect Gift
Treat yourself or a loved one.
Gift Certificate for a One Hour Massage - Regularly $65
Save 40% if you purchase your certificate before July 10th.

pay only $39
certificate can be used anytime before December 31st., 2017

Click here to purchase your gift certificate (click the services button and choose your Gift Certificate).
 
 
Posture and Health
 
Poor posture can make your back ache and your shoulders tense, but it impacts other aspects of your health and well being.  Hunching over can decrease your lung capacity, impair digestion, depress your mood and elevate stress hormones.  Posture also affects your self confidence and the way others perceive you. Even though it seems simple, standing straight with good posture can change many aspects of your health for the better.  You can go on youtube and search for some easy exercises. Of course there are many massage techniques that can help restore alignment and move those rounded shoulders and curved spine back into the correct place.
 
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EFT - A Great Tool For Healing Unresolved Emotional Events and Treating Pain

EFT is a powerful self-help method based on research showing that emotional trauma contributes greatly to disease. Clinical trials have shown that EFT is able to rapidly reduce the emotional impact of memories and incidents that trigger emotional distress. Once the distress is reduced or removed, the body can often rebalance itself, and accelerate healing. Here's how you can experience this for yourself:

  • Learn more about EFT by visiting www.emofree.com for tutorials, videos, and much more.  You'll find all the basics and be able to test drive EFT on your own issues (although at a beginner's level). If you like what you see and want to learn more give me a call. Caveat: For people who are emotionally or physically frail, qualified health professionals should be consulted before using any health procedure, including EFT.

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Refer to the Tapping Chart below to tap on the correct acupuncture points. Just use two fingers and tap lightly on each point for five to seven seconds.




 

 
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513-324-3211
 
 
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Thursday, June 15, 2017

Neck Pain and Seven Keys to Healthy Postur

Neck pain is probably the number one complaint I hear from clients followed closely by back pain complaints. All too often after spending a session on the client's neck problem I see them undoing the work before they even leave the office. They throw a heavy purse or computer bag on their shoulder or they are hunched over reading their emails. These are just some of the body mechanics that keep the cycle of pain going in an endless loop. Today I'm going to discuss seven keys to using proper body mechanics that will allow your neck to feel better with or without a massage.






Problem #1 – A Flexed Head Posture
2.jpg
Flexion is when you bend your head forward as in reading a book or working on a cell phone or typing on a computer keyboard.The problem is that when we move our head forward it is no longer in balance with our trunk. Our chin would literally drop to our chest were it not for our posterior (back of neck) neck muscles contracting. This results in overuse and strain. Translation....a sore neck.
Whenever possible try to bring the book or phone up to eye level as you read or work. You obviously can't do this with your computer so be aware of the problem. If you are stuck at a desk for long periods put a post it note on your computer with 30/30 on it. Use it as a reminder to stand up every thirty minutes or so and stretch for 30 seconds.

Problem #2 – Head forward and Extended
3.jpg
This occurs when we stick our chin out and our head forward. Similar to a flexed neck posture this condition involves flexion of the lower neck (bending head forward) while extending the upper neck and head (bending head up and back). This posture puts tremendous strain and pressure on your neck extensor muscles which include the trapezius and a series of muscles that connect into the base (occipital) area of your skull. When clients come in and say “it feels like their shoulders are attached to their neck” this is one of the reasons. To fix this posture try to tuck your chin in to bend your head forward and think of pulling your neck back in more of a straight line with your trunk rather than just bend your head backwards.

Problem #3 – Holding the arms out to the side and in front of you as you tend to do when working on a computer
5.jpg
When you hold the arms in this manner your trapezius muscles contract to stabilize your scapula. This contraction creates many of those knots clients tend to complain about and contribute to that feeling of the shoulders feeling drawn up to your neck. We tend to hold our arms like this when the computer keyboard or mouse is too far way or we try to hold a book or magazine up to eye level when reading.
To prevent this it's better to bring the work closer to your body so your upper arms are hanging vertically down by your side.

Problem #4 – Carrying a purse or bag on your shoulder
  4.jpg
Even if the bag is empty the natural slope of the shoulder means you have to elevate the scapula/shoulder girdle by contracting the upper trapezius and levator scapulae to prevent the bag from sliding off. This isometric contraction abuses these muscles of the neck. If the bag is heavy it's even worse because a more powerful contraction is needed and the strap cuts off circulation. It's better to wear the bag across the body or use a back pack or family pack. The best option is to use a bag on wheels.

Problem #5 Carrying a weight in our hand 
7.jpg
Examples include carrying a computer bag, heavy purse or suitcase. Holding any weight in the hand creates a traction that pulls the shoulder girdle down toward the ground. This action must be countered by upper back muscles such as the trapezius, levator scapulae and rhomboids. It is better to use a bag on wheels a backpack or at least split the weight between two hands.







Problem #6 – Crimping a phone between the shoulder and ear 
6.jpg
Crimping requires lateral flexion (bending sideways) of the neck and elevation of the shoulder girdle. This requires contraction of all the muscles of the neck especially the trapezius and levator scapulae. An alternative is to hold it with opposite side hand or even better use a handset.



Problem #7 – Unhealthy sleep posture

8.jpg
The average person sleeps between six and seven hours per night. An unhealthy sleep posture can greatly add to a neck condition. If you sleep on your stomach your neck is forced into a posture of neck rotation for the entire night. If your pillow is too thick your neck is forced into excess flexion (head bent forward) all night. The best sleep posture is either on the back with a small pillow that supports the normal curve of the neck or on the side with a pillow that supports the head and neck in a neutral posture.

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Gel Plumps Up Spine’s Shock Absorbers


Spinal Disc DegenerationSpinal disc degeneration is a common problem as people age. While age is a factor, poor posture,   couch potato syndrome and lack of exercise are also contributors. Regular massage to re-align the spine and break up adhesions are very effective at increasing blood flow and restoring flexibility to the spine.

The myoskeletal alignment techniques developed by Erik Dalton which I use in my therapy sessions specifically target the vertebra, discs and the tiny muscles that connect them.

Now there is good news for people who have let their backs go or whose backs are too far gone for  traditional massage or physical therapy to help.  There is a new liquid gel injection that  may stop or  reverse the degeneration of spinal discs.


DUKE (US) — A new biomaterial that changes from a liquid to a gel after injection may stop or reverse the degeneration of spinal discs, researchers say.
The health conditions affect thousands of Americans. To use cell therapies, however, scientists have to keep the cells alive, synthesize the appropriate replacement material, and get it to the right place in a patient’s spine. With newly made biomaterials from Duke University’s Pratt School of Engineering, that goal could be closer.
In a proof-of-concept study published online in the journal Biomaterials, graduate student Aubrey Francisco and biomedical engineering professor Lori Setton describe a new biomaterial designed to deliver a booster shot of reparative cells to the nucleus pulposus, or NP—the jelly-like cushion naturally found between spinal discs. The NP tissue distributes pressure and provides spine mobility, helping to relieve back pain.
“Our primary goal was to create a material that would be liquid at the start, gel after injection in the disc space, and keep the cells in the location where they’re needed,” Setton says. “Our second goal was to create a material that would provide the delivered cells with the environmental cues to promote their persistence and biosynthesis.”
Disc degeneration
Disc degeneration is a common problem as people age. Over time, the soft, compressible discs that work as the spine’s shock absorbers break down. Although this intervertebral disc degeneration can occur anywhere along the spine, it mainly happens near the neck and lower back, causing intense pain. Individuals with this condition can also develop herniated discs, osteoarthritis, or spinal narrowing, known as spinal stenosis.

In the new approach, therapeutic cells are delivered to degenerated intervertebral discs within a biomaterial carrier that keeps them from leaking out of place. (Credit: Aubrey Francisco) Previous lab research has shown that re-implanting NP cells, or even stem cells, can delay disc degeneration. Several companies already offer cell delivery strategies, but the methods are poor and ineffective. “They allow the cells to quickly migrate out of and away from the injection site,” Francisco says. Cells stay put The team’s delivery strategy keeps the cells in place and provides cues that mimic laminin, a protein in native nucleus pulposus tissue. Laminin is normally found in juvenile but not degenerated discs and allows injected cells to attach and remain in place with the delivered biomaterial. Laminin may also enable the cells to survive longer and produce more of the appropriate extracellular matrix or structural underpinning of the discs that help stop degeneration, Setton says. The researchers developed a gel mix designed to reintroduce NP cells to the intervertebral disc (IVD) site. The gel mixes together three omponents: the protein laminin-111 that has been chemically modified and two polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogels that can attach to the modified laminin. Separately, these substances remain in a liquid state. The gel, however, holds the cells in place upon injection. The National Institutes of Health funded the research. Source: Duke University Original Study DOI: 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2013.06.038